World of Aerospace

     What is Inertial Navigation, Strapdown Inertial Navigation, Position Fixing Navigation System, Dead Reckoning, Platform Systems and more...

Strapdown Inertial Navigation System

Inertial Navigation and most importantly strapdown inertial navigation systems have become vitally important in today's aerospace applications from aircrafts to missiles.

 

To land and sea systems, strapdown inertial navigation systems are being used widely.

 

Inertial Navigation

The use of inertial sensors gyroscopes and accelerometers to sense the rotational and translational motion (of a body) with respect to an inertial reference frame is know as Inertial Navigation.

 

If we are able to measure the acceleration, it is possible to calculate the change in velocity and position by performing successive integration of acceleration with respect to time to give us the change in velocity and position.

 

Inertial Navigation systems are dependant on the availability of the info about the vehicle or body at the start of the navigation.

 

Navigation – Platform Systems

When the inertial sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) are mounted on a stabilized platform and the platform is mechanically isolated from rotational motion of the body the resulting navigation system is known as Platform Systems or Stabilized Platform Systems.

 

Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems

When the inertial sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) are rigidly attached to the body of the vehicle the resulting navigation system is known as Strap down Inertial Navigation System.

 

Position Fixing Navigation Systems

Position Fixing systems are navigation systems which rely upon the observation of the other bodies or other naturally occurring phenomenon e.g. determination of the position by the navigator using measurements and observation taken from celestial bodies.

 

Dead Reckoning

Dead Reckoning is a process whereby, the present position of the body may be calculated from the measurement of speed and direction and having the information about the body’s initial position. The process takes place by noting the last known position and time (at which the measurement is made) and noting the average speed and heading since that time and also noting the present time. Since, we have to calculate the present position; the speed has to be resolved through the heading angle so that we have two components that lie upon north and east. The two velocity components are then multiplied by the elapsed time since last position to give us the change in position. So in order to get the present position the changes in position are summed with the initial position.





 
 
 

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